Parent Tip of the Week: 5 Ways to Stay Healthily Hydrated This Winter

Parent Tip of the Week: 5 Ways to Stay Healthily Hydrated This Winter

(Family Features) When the mercury drops, it’s more important than ever to stay properly hydrated. During the winter, people may not seem to sweat as much as in the summer, but that doesn’t lessen one’s risk of dehydration.

“As a hospital physician, I’ve seen far too many people succumb to dehydration-related health scares, stemming from high-elevation ski trips to travel to simply forgetting to drink water because it’s cold outside,” says Dr. Ralph E. Holsworth, director of clinical and scientific research for Essentia Water and medical physician at Southeast Colorado Hospital. “Staying properly hydrated can help ensure good health through the winter, reduce dry skin and even help you flush toxins out of your body to reduce the chances of getting a winter cold or flu.”

Boost your body’s hydration
Roughly 75 percent of the U.S. population is chronically dehydrated. By the time you feel thirsty (and sometimes when you don’t) you may already be getting dehydrated. Whether you’re skiing or just taking a walk on a brisk day, these are simple tips to help you stay hydrated throughout the winter season and beyond.
1. Set a daily water intake goal. A good rule of thumb for daily water intake from food and fluids is 2 liters for females and 2.5 liters for males with moderate physical activity levels. Adjust your personal goal to account for climate and activity level. Start your day by filling a tumbler or setting out bottles of your favorite water totaling your goal. Supplement with healthy foods that have high water content like soup, salad and pears.

2. Winter it up. During cooler weather, chilled water isn’t very enticing. To make it more appealing, warm a mug of water or add a burst of flavor from your favorite winter fruit like oranges, tangerines or cranberries. Drop in a cinnamon stick for an added flavor kick and enticing aroma.

3. Check the mirror. A tried and true way to know if you’re getting enough water is to check your mirror. If your skin appears dry and flaky, it’s time to drink more fluids.

4. Drink electrolyte-enhanced alkaline water (also called functional water). Wellness experts agree that disease and infection have a hard time thriving in an alkaline environment. High-pH water can help neutralize acid levels and restore your body to a natural state. Functional water, such as Essentia Water, the top selling alkaline water, can help you avoid or fight winter colds and flu, hydrate your skin and re-hydrate someone who is showing signs of dehydration.

5. Pack the H20. From carrying a backpack to wearing a special hydration pack – it’s important to bring water with you during winter outings. If you simply can’t bring it with you, be sure you have a list of stores that offer bottled water, and keep a supply of it in your car’s trunk for emergencies.

While you may not feel it, your body is in need of proper hydration even on the coldest winter days.

For more tips for staying well, visit www.essentiawater.com.

tip-of-the-week-featured2

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may also like

Child Developmental Chart and Age-Appropriate Toys

Today’s Parent Tip of the Week is brought to
you by Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center

This developmental chart lists some skills typical of a child’s development from infancy through 5 years old. Children may vary in their development. If you have any questions concerning your child’s development, contact your pediatrician and/or ask about an early intervention program, such as that provided by Cleveland Hearing & Speech Center (call 216-698-7500 for information).

1-3 Months

Babies like to:
Listen to musical sounds
Stare at movement and light
Be held and rocked
Reach/feel with open hands

Give your baby:
Soft musical toys/rattles
Lamps throwing light patterns
Your arms, singing, smile

4-6 months

Babies like to:
Shake, feel and bang things
Sit with support

Give your baby:
Crib gym
Cups, spoons and pot lids
High chair suction toys

7-9 months

Babies like to:
Roll over and pivot on stomach
Throw, wave and bang toys
Gum objects

Give your baby:
Bathtub toys
Teether and gumming toys
Space to roll around

10-12 months

Babies like to:
Play pat-a-cake
Pull up and get back down
Place things where they’re wanted

Give your baby:
Motion toys
Baking tins and clothes pins
Nestled plastic cups

1 year to 15 months

Babies like to:
Use one or two words
Be hugged
Try feeding themselves

Give your baby:
Lots of conversation
Personal dish, cup and spoon
You on the floor

16 months to 2 years

Babies like to:
Get into everything
Identify parts of themselves
Fetch and carry
Turn pages

Give your baby:
A childproof house
A shape sorting box
A toy telephone
Picture books

2 years to 30 months

Babies like to:
Help with housework
Kick a large ball
Play on riding toys

Give your baby:
Large balls and push toys
Tricycle or big wheel
Shelves to put things away

30 months to 3 years

Children like to:
Put clothing on
Work with their fingers
Sing songs and repeat rhymes

Give your child:
Big crayons and paper
Tape player or record player
Construction sets

3 years to 4 years

Children like to:
Cut with rounded scissors
Play games with other children
Play with sand and water

Give your child:
More responsibility
Things to cut and paste
Backyard pool or sandbox

4 years to 5 years

Children like to:
Play ball
Repeat nursery rhymes
Dress themselves
Sing songs

Give your child:
Balls of different sizes
Time to dress himself
Love and affection