Stop the Struggle: Homework Help for Parents and Kids

Stop the Struggle: Homework Help for Parents and Kids

Help your kids with their homework

Homework can become a daily struggle for parents, but it doesn’t have to be. Local teachers provide tips and tricks on how to get your children motivated to complete their homework and be successful in school.

Cher Culliton

Cher Culliton

Middle School Language Arts

As a parent, I could do without homework, but I strongly believe it’s a necessity in helping kids learn time management. Google Keep is a great app for making lists. My kids have it on their phones, and it also links to the Chromebooks they use for school. They can make a list of homework that needs to be done and check things off as they complete them.

Chris Bezzeg

Chris Bezzeg

High School Language Arts

I think of coaching when I think of homework: the opportunity is there to get better. The kids who put in more time outside of practice get more playing time because they are more prepared and have improved. Kids get more out of class when the homework is complete (if it’s meaningful work).

Jenny Hunter

Jenny Hunter

High School Language Arts

Education doesn’t just happen at school. We are always learning, which is why you should do your homework regularly and continue to learn all the time.

Beth Moffat

Beth Moffat

Middle School Language Arts

Students need to see the benefit of doing homework. So often kids believe that it’s just busywork for them. They should set a short amount of time to do work as soon as they get home from school while the ideas and lessons are still fresh in their minds. If they see the benefits and are able to practice that skill, the more successful they will be in school.

Sarah Meikle

Sarah Meikle

Speech Language Pathologist

I know all kids and families are different, but for us, it works best to have homework time as soon as my kids get home from school. If I let them play first to let some steam off, it’s too hard to reel them back in. They know once their work is done, they’re free to play until dinner time. We also have a large whiteboard on the wall where I chart out all of their assignments, to help them keep track of the things that aren’t necessarily assigned each day and due the next day. We check things off as they’re done, so the kids see they’re making progress and see what else is left to do each night and what they need to pack up to bring for the next day. Honestly, we still struggle with homework. There are many nights where there is whining and crying and a fight to get it done.

Sarah Rivera

Sarah Rivera

High School STEM/Science

My tip is to take doing homework in chunks. Always give a short break every 15-20 minutes to maximize their attention and keep them from getting too restless.

Nancy Plisko

Nancy Plisko

Middle School Language Arts

Homework. The word no student wants to hear at the end of a class. How can parents avoid the battle, and see to it that their child finishes their homework? It’s all in the delivery.

Help your child understand that homework isn’t just something that has to get done because the teacher assigned it. As adults, we wouldn’t want to complete something unless we understood its purpose. Children are no different. Homework is an opportunity to practice a particular skill so that they can take ownership of their own comprehension. Beyond helping them understand the logical purpose of homework, I haven’t met a child yet who doesn’t love a reward for hard work completed well. Design a calendar with your child, and pick out inexpensive stickers to use as an indicator of completed homework throughout the week. Your child could decide the reward. Children tend to “buy in” and take ownership if they are part of the planning. Set the rules and expectations early, help your child understand the purpose of homework, and provide a well-deserved reward for all of their hard work.

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